The People of the Kattawapiskak River

dir. Alanis Obomsawin

The People of the Kattawapiskak River

dir. Alanis Obomsawin

The People of the Kattawapiskak River

dir. Alanis Obomsawin

The People of the Kattawapiskak River

dir. Alanis Obomsawin

The People of the Kattawapiskak River

dir. Alanis Obomsawin

Series - Human Rights Watch

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Iconic filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin offers a shattering look at the Attawapiskat First Nation community in northern Ontario, where shockingly low living standards — and the Canadian government's gross mismanagement — compelled Chief Theresa Spence to declare a state of emergency in 2011.
Prior to undertaking her recent hunger strike, Chief Theresa Spence had declared a state of emergency in the Attawapiskat First Nation community in northern Ontario, due to the shocking housing conditions in the community, the Canadian government's gross mismanagement of the situation, and the presence of a lucrative diamond mine operating on the land. In The People of the Kattawapiskak River, iconic filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin investigates the stories behind the media storm, and introduces us to the mothers, fathers, and children of Attawapiskat, who live in conditions even worse than had been imagined. Unsparingly depicting the shockingly grim realities of life in Attawapiskat — toddlers crawling around in houses that are falling apart, parents who cannot afford the exorbitant cost of the few groceries that are available to them, the residents' struggles to find clean, drinkable water — Obomsawin also paints a portrait of a resilient community fighting to hold on to their life and their future. A crucial film in the midst of a media-saturated public debate that often relegates those most affected to the sidelines, The People of the Kattawapiskak River is at once a powerful chapter in the long history of struggle by Canada's Aboriginal peoples, a radical exposé of a vital contemporary issue, and an impassioned call to action.