Ginger Snaps

dir. John Fawcett

Ginger Snaps

dir. John Fawcett

TIFF Cinematheque - Canadian Open Vault

Skip to schedule and film credits
Cleverly equating the onset of puberty with the unleashing of an implacable feminine id, this revisionist take on the werewolf legend is both a celebration of female power, a critique of the dangers of conformity, and a smart, scary, straight-up horror film.

Two Goth-influenced sisters have their boring suburban lives disrupted when the eldest and more rebellious, Ginger (Katharine Isabelle), is bitten by a werewolf shortly before she gets her first period. As Ginger's bloodlust rises along with her libido, her sister Brigitte (Emily Perkins) does her best to help her while also trying to look out for the safety of her oblivious parents, her potential boyfriend (the local dope dealer, the only other person sensitize enough to realize something's amiss), and the rest of the townspeople. Cleverly equating the onset of menstruation with the unleashing of an implacable feminine id, screenwriter Karen Walton (Orphan Black) and director John Fawcett's Ginger Snaps is both a celebration of female power, a critique of the dangers of conformity, and a smart, scary, straight-up horror film.

Tonight's screening features an introduction by screenwriter Karen Walton and Ernest Mathijs, author of a new monograph on Ginger Snaps co-published by TIFF and University of Toronto Press.