Rushmore

dir. Wes Anderson

Series - Retrospective

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Wes Anderson and co-writer Owen Wilson's critically acclaimed follow-up to their singularly quirky debut Bottle Rocket ingeniously redefined Bill Murray's screen persona.

"Maybe I'm spending too much of my time starting up clubs and putting on plays. I should probably be trying harder to score chicks." — Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman)

Self-styled fifteen-year-old prodigy Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) is prestigious Rushmore Academy's most engaged and least scholarly student, participating in or starting almost all of the school's extracurricular activities while failing nearly every class. Max finds a kindred spirit in lonely, alienated middle-aged tycoon Herman Blume (Bill Murray), but the two unlikely friends are soon pitted against each other when they both fall for the comely, widowed first-grade teacher Ms. Cross (Olivia Williams), and end up in a cutthroat competition for her affections. Wes Anderson and co-writer Owen Wilson's critically acclaimed follow-up to their singularly quirky debut Bottle Rocket both crystallized the team's unique comic vision and visual style and ingeniously redefined Murray's screen persona, mining a rich vein of melancholy, pathos and darkness beneath the former Meatball's smart-alecky exterior — a revelation that other canny filmmakers would be quick to take advantage of, most notably Sofia Coppola in Lost in Translation and Jim Jarmusch in Broken Flowers.