La rabbia di Pasolini

The Rage of Pasolini

dir. Pier Paolo Pasolini, Giuseppe Bertolucci

TIFF Cinematheque - Retrospective

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A restoration of Pasolini's searing, long unavailable essay film, which offers the director's probing and caustic commentary on celebrity culture, the Cold War, Italy's postwar economic boom and the world's rampant injustices.

NEW 35mm PRINT!

A recently restored version of a key Pasolini film, the director's impassioned meditation on a world "tamed by unhappiness, anxiety, by the fear of a war." Like Marker and Godard, Pasolini was a master at combining poetry and politics, as this far-ranging personal essay gloriously shows. The film's producer, fearing Pasolini's polemics, invited right-winger Giovanni Guareschi to append a "balanced" response to the director's critique of contemporary society; this 2008 restoration by Giuseppe Bertolucci excises the Guareschi segment and presents Pasolini's rage in all its passionate intensity. A majestic collage of newsreel footage, by turns harsh and tender, disturbing and amusing, La rabbia entirely earns its blunt title with the director's probing commentary on celebrity culture, the Cold War, Italy's postwar economic boom and the world's rampant injustices. (The inevitable question: What might his La rabbia, made about today's Italy/Europe/world, look like?) Pasolini's montage of startling images — Marilyn Monroe, dictators, street protests — gives poetic force to a vision of global iniquity and inequality. "A text in poetry expressed through images, and overwhelmed by anger. Against the bourgeoisie, barbarism, intolerance, prejudices, triviality, respectability" (Carlo Di Carlo).